Taoism

Spirituality and Absence

In our last reflection in this sequence of posts, we spoke about spirituality and presence and now we turn to its apparent opposite: the spirituality of absence. In talking about spiritual matters, it would seem that we are always involved in the balancing of polar opposites. Let us turn, then, momentarily to reflect upon this existential balancing in…

Tai Chi ‘May Help Cope Better with Diseases of Ageing’

A study published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine last week found that Tai Chi is a suitable exercise for older people to relieve some symptoms of four age-related diseases: cancer, heart failure, osteoarthritis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The data for the research came from a review of more than 30 studies looking at the…

The Man behind The Way: Lao Tzu & Daoist Spirituality

Little is truly known about the Chinese philosopher Lao Tzu, who is a guiding figure in Daoism (also translated as Taoism), which is a still popular spiritual practice. He is said to have been a record keeper in the court of the central Chinese Zhou Dynasty in the 6th century B.C., and an older contemporary of…

L.G.B.T. Spirituality: Taoism

Many people who are curious about Taoism may speculate what the general consensus among Tao cultivators is regarding many political and ethical issues. Some of these are in the middle ground between politics and ethics; issues like “is being LGBT ‘wrong’ or ‘unnatural’?” Some may argue that Taoism’s emphasis on assuming a natural state is…

Yin-yang &….. early Celts

The philosophical origin of Taoism is attributed to Lao Tzu and Zhuangzi in the 4th century bc. Although many different branches evolved, the concept of ‘Yin-yang’ eventually found favour. Chinese folk religion adapted and assimilated Taoism into diverse practices like Feng shui, which has now become uber-fashionable in the West.

Mothers Of Divinity

In all religious traditions there are tales of extraordinary mothers. These mothers were prophetesses and goddesses; and gave birth to gods, prophets and religious leaders. The mothers from our religious traditions were theologians, artists, warriors and business leaders. Many of them were revolutionaries and feminists in their own time. They were models of compassion, love, grace, self-sacrifice, purity, protectiveness and ferocity.